Revolt and Equilibrium: A Comparative Study of Nineteen Eighty-Four and L'Homme Revolte

By:
Dr. Miho Takashima
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Despite the differences between their social and cultural backgrounds, Orwell (1903-1950) and Camus (1913-1960), each of whom died at the age of forty-six in the first January of a decade, seemed to share many features. Besides their clear, plain styles and love of nature, their passion for human integrity, freedom and justice led them to take part in the controversial political issues of the early twentieth century: imperialism, Fascism, the Spanish Civil War, the resistance to Nazi onslaught and to Stalinisit concentration camps, and the relationship between writers and politics. Their respective upbringings as well as their rather unique and diverse experiences had caused them personal and political dilemmas through their lives. But at the same time, these enabled both writers to gain a certain objectivity, thereby making them beware of the danger of political nad intellectual extremism, "la demesure". This was to become one of the underlying themes of Nineteen Eighty-Four and L'Homme Revolte, along with their more explicit purpose of warning against totalitarianism.
In this presentation, therefore, I would like to focus upon both the human and political aspects of these two works as well as the lives of the authors.I shall also reconsider the signification of Nineteen Eighty-Four and L'Homme Revolte, the role of aritist-intellectuals, and my own position in relation to the problems of our time.


Keywords: A Comparative Study, Nineteen Eighty-Four and L'Homme Revolte, George Orwell and Albert Camus
Stream: Literature, Literary Studies
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: Revolt and Equilibrium


Dr. Miho Takashima

Lecturer, Department of International Studies,
Faculty of Humanities and Social Science, Meisei University

Japan

After graduating from Sophia University in Tokyo where I specialized in French language and the studies of International Relations, I worked for Banque Nationale de Paris, Tokyo Branch for 3 years. Then, I went to Essex University to study MA and Ph.D in the area of comparative literature and cultures, which is what I have been teaching at Meisei University since 2003.

Ref: H06P0063