Fish for Food, Fish for Livelihoods: Investigating the Potential of Fine Art as a Language of Ecological Communication

By:
Mr Lindsay Broughton,
Dr Jane Quon
To add a paper, Login.

Conservation of the marine ecosystem is a global issue of the utmost significance. In an increasing number of regions around the world the marine ecosystem is under massive stress, with ecological catastrophes resulting from human activity. Such catastrophes have resulted in disastrous socio-economic consequences for vast communities of people. These communities are the principal concern of the World Fish Center, which undertakes aquatic resource management and sustainable development programs in various developing countries.

Lindsay Broughton will discuss the communicative function of the arts; the arts and social change; the relationship between aesthetic response and meaning and will posit the case for art more powerfully and systematically to engage in ecological themes. In his presentation paper he will discuss artworks developed in the context of the World Fish Center’s sustainable communities fisheries project in Vietnam’s Mekong Delta and Cambodia’s Tonlé Sap.

Jane Quon (artist and Research Fellow at the Tasmanian School of Art), will present multimedia artworks developed in collaboration with WorldFish to test the extent to which visual communication, through multimedia installations, can assist the development of environmental responsibility by highlighting the crucial issue of food security.

Five non-narrative films will be presented and form a focus for discussion and evaluation of the extent to which, via the aesthetic dimension of human experience, artworks may effectively communicate the ecological and socio-economic issues they address: and if they do, what kinds of meanings are transmitted, and what sort of impact upon environmental consciousness might realistically be expected?


Keywords: Marine ecosystem sustainability, Gender in Fisheries, Non-narrative film, Multimedia installations, Aesthetic experience and meaning, Environmental ethics, Art and science
Stream: Science, Environment and the Humanities
Presentation Type: Paper Presentation in English
Paper: Fish for Food, Fish for Livelihoods


Mr Lindsay Broughton

Australian Research Council Fellow (Industry), Tasmanian School of Art, University of Tasmania
Australia

Jane Quon is an ARC Post Doctoral Fellow at the School of Art, University of Tasmania. Her research focus is the crucial issue of food security in the Mekong Delta.

Jane is coordinator of the Art, Communication and Marine Ecology (ACME) research hub of a University of Tasmania project that investigates potential applications of the arts within environmental education.

She coordinates an interdisciplinary subject, Marine Ecology: Synergies in Art and Science which has visual outcomes in a range of contemporary media.

Jane's research and artwork focuses upon the fragile ecologies of the marine environment. As such, a principal objective of her work is the belief that visual communication, through works of multimedia, can assist the development of environmental responsibility.

Through the agency of an Australian Research Council Grant and the University of Tasmania she has forged a partnership with the Malaysia-based international NGO, WorldFish, to investigate the potential of contemporary art - specifically non-narrative film-based installations - in ecological communication.

Other partners in the project are: The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre and Fishcare (State Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment).

Through the agency of an Australian Research Council Grant and the University of Tasmania she has forged a partnership with the Malaysia-based international NGO, WorldFish, to investigate the potential of contemporary art - specifically non-narrative film-based installations - in ecological communication.

Other partners in the project are: The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre and Fishcare (State Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment).

Jane has had extensive experience not only as a visual artist, but also in art teaching, the media, primary industry and tourism.

Dr Jane Quon

Australian Post Doctoral Fellow (Industry), School of Art, University of Tasmania
Australia

Jane is coordinator of the Art, Communication and Marine Ecology (ACME) research hub of a University of Tasmania project that investigates potential applications of the arts within environmental education.

She coordinates an interdisciplinary subject, Marine Ecology: Synergies in Art and Science which has visual outcomes in a range of contemporary media.

Jane's research and artwork focuses upon the fragile ecologies of the marine environment. As such, a principal objective of her work is the belief that visual communication, through works of multimedia, can assist the development of environmental responsibility.

Through the agency of an Australian Research Council Grant and the University of Tasmania she has forged a partnership with the Malaysia-based international NGO, WorldFish, to investigate the potential of contemporary art - specifically non-narrative film-based installations - in ecological communication.

Other partners in the project are: The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre and Fishcare (State Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment).

Through the agency of an Australian Research Council Grant and the University of Tasmania she has forged a partnership with the Malaysia-based international NGO, WorldFish, to investigate the potential of contemporary art - specifically non-narrative film-based installations - in ecological communication.

Other partners in the project are: The Tasmanian Museum and Art Gallery, Salamanca Arts Centre and Fishcare (State Department of Primary Industry, Water and Environment).

Jane has had extensive experience not only as a visual artist, but also in art teaching, the media, primary industry and tourism.

Ref: H06P0080